Ladder to the Moon, November 2016

 

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Santa Fe Pro Musica presents Ladder to the Moon
Musical Storytelling

Lensic Performing Arts Center
Saturday, November 5, 2016 at 4pm
Sunday, November 6, 2016 at 3pm

Santa Fe Pro Musica Orchestra
Thomas O’Connor, conductor
Ida Kavafian, violin

Santa Fe Pro Musica Orchestra

The Santa Fe Pro Musica Orchestra

Santa Fe, NM — Santa Fe Pro Musica’s Ladder to the Moon concerts celebrate musical storytelling with works by Michael Daugherty, Gabriela Lena Frank and Franz Schubert, featuring internationally-acclaimed violinist Ida Kavafian. Ms. Kavafian premiered Ladder to the Moon, a musical tribute to the art of Georgia O’Keefe, at Lincoln Center in 2006.

Join the Santa Fe Pro Musica Orchestra, conductor Thomas O’Connor, and violinist Ida Kavafian as they bring this musical story to life on stage at the Lensic Performing Arts Center this November.

WHAT
Ladder to the Moon featuring the Santa Fe Pro Musica Orchestra with
Thomas O’Connor, conductor and violinist, Ida Kavafian

WHEN
Saturday, November 5, 2016 at 4pm
Sunday, November 6, 2016 at 3pm

WHERE
Lensic Performing Arts Center
211 W San Francisco St, Santa Fe, NM 87501

PROGRAM
MICHAEL DAUGHERTY Ladder to the Moon
GABRIELA LENA FRANK Leyendas: An Andean Walkabout
SCHUBERT (arr. Gustav Mahler) Death and the Maiden

MEET THE MUSIC
Thomas O’Connor, Santa Fe Pro Musica Conductor and Music Director, presents a “behind the scenes” discussion of the music one hour prior to each concert at the Lensic Performing Arts Center. Meet the Music is free to ticket holders.

TICKETS  $20, $37, $50, $75 at the Santa Fe Pro Musica Box Office (505) 988-4640 ext 1000, Tickets Santa Fe at The Lensic (505) 988-1234, or online at http://www.santafepromusica.com and ticketssantafe.org.

Discounts for students, teachers, groups, and families are available exclusively through the Santa Fe Pro Musica Box Office.

ARTIST DINNER with Ida Kavafian Sunday, November 6 at 5:30pm
Call the Pro Musica Box Office to reserve (505) 988-4640 ext 1000

 ABOUT THE PROGRAM

MICHAEL DAUGHERTY Ladder to the Moon
GABRIELA LENA FRANK Leyendas: An Andean Walkabout
SCHUBERT (arr. Gustav Mahler) Death and the Maiden

Michael Daugherty (b. 1954)
Ladder to the Moon

The inspiration for much of Michael Daugherty’s music comes from American pop culture: “I get ideas by browsing through second-hand bookstores, antique shops and small towns that I find driving on the back roads of America. The icon can be an old postcard, magazine, photograph, knick-knack, matchbook, piece of furniture or roadmap…I use icons in my music to provide the listener and performer with a layer of reference.”

Ladder to the Moon is a two-movement work inspired by Georgia O’Keeffe’s paintings of Manhattan skyscrapers and New Mexico landscapes. It was commissioned by the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center and premiered in May 2006 with Ida Kavafian as solo violinist.

Gabriela Lena Frank (b. 1972)
Leyendas: An Andean Walkabout

Born in Berkeley, California to a mother of mixed Peruvian/Chinese ancestry and a father of Lithuanian/Jewish descent, Gabriela Lena Frank celebrates mixed cultures in her music, incorporating Latin American folklore, poetry, mythology, and Native American musical styles into a Western classical framework. She drew inspiration for her Leyendas: An Andean Walkabout “from the idea of mestizaje… where cultures can coexist without the subjugation of one by the other. As such, this piece mixes elements from the western classical and Andean folk music traditions.” It is a wonderfully colorful work evocative of panpipes, flutes, drums and guitars.

Franz Schubert (1797-1828)
Death and the Maiden

Schubert’s String Quartet No. 14 Death and the Maiden is one of the pillars of the chamber music repertoire. It was composed in 1824 after Schubert suffered through a serious illness and feared death was imminent.  It is an intense work based upon his song of the same name. The text by Matthias Claudius (1740-1815) recounts an old European myth, where Death demands a pre-nuptial night with a bride-to-be. If she declines, Death will take her betrothed on their wedding day.

Gustav Mahler (1860-1911) had obtained a score of Schubert’s string quartet Death and the Maiden and made copious notes and detailed instructions indicating how the music could be arranged for string orchestra. After his death, Mahler’s daughter Anna discovered these notes and brought them to the attention of two Mahler scholars who created orchestral parts according to Mahler’s annotations and published the new score in 1984.

Ida Kavafian Artistic Director 2013

About Ida Kavafian

Ida Kavafian enjoys an international reputation as one of the most versatile musicians performing today. With a repertoire as diverse as her talents, Ms. Kavafian has electrified stages as a recitalist as well as a soloist with major orchestras across the globe. For over 25 years, Ms. Kavafian has been the artistic director of the highly successful festival, Music from Angel Fire, in New Mexico. Ms. Kavafian’s commitment to contemporary music has led to many world premieres by composers such as Toru Takemitsu, who wrote a concerto for her, and to tours and recordings with jazz greats Chick Corea and Wynton Marsalis as well as Mark O’Connor.

Read more about Ida at: http://www.barrettartists.com/artist.php?id=ikavafian

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A Conversation about Women in the Performing Arts
Saturday, November 5 at 10:30am
Jean Cocteau Cinema
Co-presented by Santa Fe Pro Musica, Women’s International Study Center, and Music from Angel Fire.

Join us for a morning of coffee, pastries and conversation featuring Gabriela Lena Frank, Santa Fe Pro Musica and Music from Angel Fire’s 2016 Composer-in-Residence, alongside award-winning classical violinist Ida Kavafian as they discuss their role as women in the world of performing arts.

The November 5 and 6 Santa Fe Pro Musica concert program Ladder to the Moon will feature a performance of Ms. Frank’s composition by Ms. Kavafian.

Santa Fe Pro Musica is grateful to the Bruce and Hilde Howden Memorial Trust for its support of the Composer-in-Residence Program.

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About Santa Fe Pro Musica

Santa Fe Pro Musica, founded in 1980, is a non-profit performing arts organization dedicated to inspiring and educating audiences of all ages through the performance of great music.  Pro Musica performs a varied repertoire, covering four centuries of music on modern and baroque instruments, including works for chamber orchestra, small ensemble and large-scale works for orchestra and chorus.  In 2008, Pro Musica’s recording of Gustav Mahler’s Das Lied von der Erde (chamber arrangement by Schoenberg) was nominated for a GRAMMY® award in the classical category of Best Small Ensemble Performance. In August of 2012, Santa Fe Pro Musica Recordings produced a CD of Conrad Tao, pianist, performing Mozart Piano Concertos No. 17 and No. 25.  In addition to gaining national recognition over its 35 years for its artistry in performance, Santa Fe Pro Musica offers some of the most distinguished educational opportunities in northern New Mexico, reaching thousands of students every year with a Youth Concert series, a team-building, ensemble-training program (CHAMPS!), and a master class series for area music students (younger and older!).

 

The 2016-2017 Season is partially funded by the City of Santa Fe Arts Commission, the 1% Lodgers Tax, and New Mexico Arts (a Division of the Department of Cultural Affairs).

 

For more information, please visit our website: www.santafepromusica.com

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Santa Fe Pro Musica Celebrates 35th Season

PrintSanta Fe Pro Musica invites you to discover and celebrate their 35th Season. Join us for a magnificent season that is sure to transform and transport you. From Joshua Roman to Ida Kavafian to Benjamin Beilman to Anne-Marie McDermott, this year’s internationally-acclaimed guest artists join the Santa Fe Pro Musica Orchestra under the leadership of Thomas O’Connor in programs that juxtapose old and new masterpieces.

Both season subscriptions and single tickets are on sale. As a subscriber, you’ll enjoy the best seats at the best possible price, with a variety of plans that let you tailor your subscription to your schedule and budget. Subscription packages are available exclusively through the Santa Fe Pro Musica Box Office at 505.988.4640 ext.1001. Learn more at http://www.santafepromusica.com.

Single concert tickets available through http://www.ticketssantafe.org or http://www.santafepromusica.com, or by calling the Santa Fe Pro Musica Box Office at 505.988.4640 ext 1001.

REVOLUTIONARIES AND ROMANTICS
Santa Fe Pro Musica Opens its 35th Season
Lensic Performing Arts Center
Saturday, September 17 at 4pm and Sunday, September 18 at 3pm

Joshua Roman-by Hayley Young 1

Santa Fe Pro Musica Orchestra
Thomas O’Connor, conductor
Joshua Roman, cello

BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 4 in B-flat Major, Op. 60
JENNIFER HIGDON To the Point, String Lake and String
BARBER Cello Concerto in A Minor, Op. 22

Santa Fe Pro Musica opens their 35th season with Revolutionaries and Romantics featuring the Santa Fe Pro Musica Orchestra with conductor Thomas O’Connor and guest cellist Joshua Roman. The concert includes Beethoven’s beloved Symphony No. 4 in B-flat Major, Op. 60 and Barber’s soaring Cello Concerto in A Minor, Op. 22. The orchestra will also perform a work by Pulitzer Prize winner and highly acclaimed contemporary composer Jennifer Higdon.
Meet the Music during pre-concert talks by Thomas O’Connor one hour prior to Lensic.
Artist Dinner with Joshua Roman Sunday, September 18 at 5:30pm. Call the Santa Fe Pro Musica Box Office to reserve Artist Dinner tickets at 505.988.4640, ext 1000.
LADDER TO THE MOON
Musical Storytelling
Lensic Performing Arts Center
Saturday, November 5 at 4pm and Sunday, November 6 at 3pm

Ida Kavafian Artistic Director 2013Santa Fe Pro Musica Orchestra
Thomas O’Connor, conductor

Ida Kavafian, violin
MICHAEL DAUGHERTY Ladder to the Moon
GABRIELA LENA FRANK Leyendas: An Andean Walkabout
SCHUBERT (arr. Mahler) Death and the Maiden
The Santa Fe Pro Musica Orchestra’s Ladder to the Moon concert celebrates musical storytelling, featuring the works of Michael Daugherty, Gabriella Lena Frank and Schubert with internationally- acclaimed violinist Ida Kavafian. Ms. Kavafian premiered Ladder to the Moon, a musical tribute to the art of Georgia O’Keefe, at Lincoln Center in 2006. Weaving story, art and music recalls the tradition of storytelling throughout history.

Meet the Music during pre-concert talks by Thomas O’Connor one hour prior to Lensic concerts.
Artist Dinner with Ida Kavafian Sunday, November 6 at 5:30pm. Call the Santa Fe Pro Musica Box Office to reserve Artist Dinner tickets at 505.988.4640, ext 1000.

A Conversation About Women in the Performing Arts: Saturday, November 5 at 10:30am at the Jean Cocteau Cinema. Composer Gabriela Lena Frank and award-winning violinist Ida Kavafian discuss their role as women in the world of performing arts.

A BAROQUE CHRISTMAS
A Santa Fe Tradition
Angel Fire: December 18 at 7pm
United Church of Angel Fire
Loretto Chapel
Monday, December 19 thru Saturday, December 24 at 6pm & 8pm each evening

SF Pro Musica Loretto 104

 

Santa Fe Pro Musica Baroque Ensemble
with guest mezzo-sopranos Deborah Domanski and Avery Amereau


HANDEL
Concerto Grosso in A Major, Op. 6, No. 11
VIVALDI Nisi Dominus, RV 608
TELEMANN Paris Quartet in E Minor, TWV 43:34
Traditional Christmas Carols
The Santa Fe Pro Musica Baroque Ensemble will enliven winter evenings with performances of the Baroque masters, and feature (on alternate evenings) guest artists Deborah Domanski and Avery Amereau, mezzo-sopranos, in Vivaldi’s glorious Nisi Dominus. Make the season bright by joining us in this beloved-holiday tradition.

RHAPSODY IN BLUE
Spectacular American Favorites
Lensic Performing Arts Center
Thursday, December 29 at 7pm

Santa Fe Pro Musica Orchestra
Thomas O’Connor, conductor

Melissa Marse, piano

MICHAEL DAUGHERTY Flamingo
COPLAND Appalachian Spring
BARBER Adagio
GERSHWIN Rhapsody in Blue
As 2016 comes to a close, what better way to send it off than with an evening of Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue with the Santa Fe Pro Musica Orchestra, conducted by Thomas O’Connor with guest pianist Melissa Marse. The evening also includes favorite works by Copland, Barber and Michael Daugherty.

Meet the Music during pre-concert talks by Thomas O’Connor one hour prior to Lensic concerts.

BRENTANO STRING QUARTET
Celebrating the Centennial of the New Mexico Museum of Art
St. Francis Auditorium
Sunday, January 15 at 3pm

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HAYDN  Quartet in E-Flat Major, Op. 20 No. 1
STEPHEN HARTKE(New Work)
BEETHOVEN String Quartet in F Major, Op. 59, No. 1
Santa Fe Pro Musica proudly presents the Brentano String Quartet in performance at the St. Francis Auditorium at the New Mexico Museum of art, with a New Mexico premier of Stephen Hartke’s latest work, as well as works by Haydn and Beethoven.

“The Concert made it clear that these players could well be the best of the latest generation. Their level of individual technique was superb, while musical dialog necessary for rich chamber music was evident from first to last.” – Philadelphia Inquirer

MOZART’S BIRTHDAY
A Festive Tribute to a Beloved Composer
Lensic Performing Arts Center
Saturday, January 28 at 4pm and Sunday, January 29 at 3pm

Benjamin Beilman 3Santa Fe Pro Musica Orchestra
Thomas O’Connor, conducto

Benjamin Beilman, violin 


Mozart Violin Concerto No. 3 in G Major, K. 219
Anna Clyne Within Her Arms
Mozart Symphony No. 41 in C Major, K. 551 “Jupiter”
The Santa Fe Pro Musica Orchestra, under the leadership of Thomas O’Connor, with guest violin soloist Benjamin Beilman explore the genius of Mozart. “On the whole, it [Mozart, Symphony No. 40] was the best orchestral performance this town has heard in a good while (James Keller, Pasatiempo, April 29, 2016).

 

Meet the Music during pre-concert talks by Thomas O’Connor one hour prior to Lensic concerts.
Artist Dinner with Benjamin Beilman on Sunday, January 29 at 5:30pm. Call the Santa Fe Pro Musica Box Office to reserve Artist Dinner tickets at 505.988.4640, ext 1000.
CALIDORE STRING QUARTET
“A harmonious meeting of young and gifted musical minds.” – Ottawa Citizen
St. Francis Auditorium
Sunday, March 5, 2017 at 3pm

calidore 4

MOZART Quartet in D Minor, K. 421/417b
CAROLINE SHAW (New Work)
MENDELSSOHN Quartet in E Minor, Op. 44, No. 2
Santa Fe Pro Musica proudly presents the Calidore String Quartet in performance at the St. Francis Auditorium at the New Mexico Museum of Art, with brilliant quartets of Mozart and Mendelssohn and a new work by Caroline Shaw, the 2013 recipient of the Pulitzer Prize in music.
“Today’s classical music world is heavily populated with young string quartets and it’s a rare occasion when one turns heads as convincingly as the Calidore Quartet. This dynamic and intelligent ensemble has already demonstrated skill and maturity beyond their collective years, and hey show seemingly endless potential.” -David Finckel, Co-director of the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center

Artist Dinner with the Calidore String Quartet on Sunday, March 5 at 5:30pm. Call the Santa Fe Pro Musica Box Office to reserve Artist Dinner tickets at 505.988.4640, ext 1000.

BAROQUE HOLY WEEK
“The final aim and reason of music is the glorification of God and the refreshment of the soul.” -J.S. Bach
Loretto Chapel
Thursday, April 13, 2017 and Friday, April 14 at 7:30pm
Saturday, April 16, 2017 at 6pm

muellerheadshot1Santa Fe Pro Musica Baroque Ensemble
Kathryn Mueller, soprano

HANDEL Concerto Op. 4, No. 1 (HWV 289)
HANDEL Süßer Stille (HWV 205) from Nine German Arias
HANDEL Sonata in G Major (HWV 399)
VIVALDI Sinfonia e Sonata al Santo Sepolcro
BACH Cantata No. 82a “Ich habe genug”
The Santa Fe Pro Musica Baroque Ensemble and guest artist Kathryn Mueller, soprano, present this springtime favorite in the historic Loretto Chapel, featuring uplifting works by Bach, Handel and Vivaldi.

 

THE FIVE BEETHOVEN PIANO CONCERTOS: PART I
  “…grandiose dimensions, profound utterances, and unprecedented power.” (Robert Levin)
Lensic Performing Arts Center
Saturday, April 20, 2017 at 4pm and Sunday, April 30, 2017 at 3pm

Anne Marie 4.jpg

Santa Fe Pro Musica Orchestra
Thomas O’Connor, conductor

Anne-Marie Mc Dermott, piano


Beethoven Piano Concerto No. 2 in B-Flat Major, Op. 19
Beethoven Piano Concerto No. 3 in C Minor, Op. 37
Beethoven Piano Concerto No. 4 in G Major, Op. 58
Profound and powerful, the Beethoven Piano Concertos are among the most extraordinary works in classical music. Come hear the Santa Fe Pro Musica Orchestra with guest pianist Anne-Marie McDermott. Ms. McDermott’s dazzling career has spanned over 25 years, performing concertos, recitals and chamber music in hundreds of cities throughout the United States, Europe and Asia.
Anne-Marie McDermott returns in our 2017-2018 season to perform Beethoven Piano Concertos No. 1 and No. 5.

 Meet the Music during pre-concert talks by Thomas O’Connor one hour prior to Lensic concerts.
Artist Dinner with Anne-Marie McDermott on Sunday, April 30 at 5:30pm. Call the Santa Fe Pro Musica Box Office to reserve Artist Dinner tickets at 505.988.4640, ext 1000.

 

 

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Santa Fe Pro Musica presents LAUGH OUT LOUD

Join us at the Lensic on July 7th at 7:15PM for an evening of Silent Movies. Live Music. Comedy. Food Trucks.

Children $5 (12 and under) | Adults $25
Tickets at ticketssantafe.org or 505.988.4640 ext 1000.

Proceeds benefit Santa Fe Pro Musica’s programs and outreach activities.

LaughOutLoud_EBlastFNL

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Santa Fe Pro Musica Welcomes Conrad Tao for Season Finale

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Santa Fe Pro Musica welcomes the return of pianist and composer Conrad Tao in its concert The Emperor featuring the Santa Fe Pro Musica Orchestra on April 23 at 4pm and April 24 at 3pm. On Friday April 22, Conrad Tao will play a solo program Conrad Tao in Recital at 7:30 pm. The New York Times notes “[Tao’s] program…conveyed the scope of his probing intellect and openhearted vision.” Join us as we welcome back the extraordinary Conrad Tao to the Lensic Stage for his solo recital performance and his two concerts with the Santa Fe Pro Musica Orchestra.

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WHAT |          Conrad Tao in Recital
                          Conrad Tao, pianist
WHEN |          Friday, April 22 at 7:30pm

WHERE |       Lensic Performing Arts Center, 211 W San Francisco St, Santa Fe, NM


WHAT |          The Emperor
                          Santa Fe Pro Musica Orchestra, Thomas O’Connor conductor and
Conrad Tao, pianist

WHEN |          Saturday, April 23 at 4pm & Sunday, April 24 at 3pm

WHERE |       Lensic Performing Arts Center, 211 W San Francisco St, Santa Fe, NM


TICKETS |     $20, $35, $48, $69 at the Santa Fe Pro Musica Box Office (505) 988-4640, ext. 1000, Tickets Santa Fe at The Lensic (505) 988-1234, or online at www.santafepromusica.com. Discounts for students, teachers, groups, and families are available exclusively through the Santa Fe Pro Musica Box Office.

Meet the Music | Learn more about the music you love! Thomas O’Connor, Santa Fe Pro Musica Conductor and Music Director, will present a “behind the scenes” discussion of the music one hour prior to each Orchestra concert at the Lensic – Free to ticket holders.

Artist Dinner with Conrad Tao | Sunday, April 24 at 5:30pm at Andiamo! Reservations are required through the Santa Fe Pro Musica Box Office at 505.988.4640 ext 1000. $85 per person.

About the Programs and Composers

Conrad Tao in Recital

Rzewski North American Ballads: Which Side Are You On?
Copland Piano Sonata
Rzewski North American Ballads: Winnsboro Cotton Mill Blues
Ravel Valses nobles et sentimentales
Schumann Carnaval, Op. 9

Frederic Rzewski (b. 1938)
Which Side Are You On? (From North American Ballads)
Winnsboro Cotton Mill Blues (From North American Ballads)

The American born composer and pianist Frederic Rzewski is currently Professor of Composition at the Conservatoire Royal de Musique in Belgium. New York Times critic John Rockwell (1980) remarks that Mr. Rzewski’s “tunes have a leftist political caste and reflect his long-standing concernfrederic-rzewski_1558903c for the relationship between art and politics.” Nicolas Slonimsky (1993) paints a more vivid portrait of the composer: “He is a granitically overpowering piano technician, capable of depositing huge boulders of sonoristic material across the keyboard without actually wrecking the instrument.”

In North American Ballads, a set of four pieces written in 1978, Rzewski looks back to 1930s America and the issue of labor rights. The text of Winnsboro Cotton Mill Blues comments on the harsh working conditions in the textile mills of North Carolina. The piece begins with references to the machines of the industrial revolution and builds to a deafening climax. As the sound dissipates, the blues emerge illustrating the uprising to unionize factory workers.

Old man Sargent, sitting at the desk,
The damned old fool won’t give us no rest.
He’d take the nickels off a dead man’s eyes
To buy a Coca-Cola and an Eskimo Pie.

Which side are you on? concerns a series of strikes in the coal mines of “Bloody Harlan” County Kentucky.  Malcolm Cowley (New Republic) referred to the controversy here as a “battle in which everyone must take his stand. Whatever brings relief to the miners is an enemy of the operators.”

They say in Harlan County
There are no neutrals there;
You’ll either be a union man
Or a thug for J. H. Blair.
Which side are you on?  Which side are you on?

Aaron Copland (1900-1990)
Piano Sonata

Aaron Copland is one of the most important composers in the 20th century, acclaimed for his scores for film and ballet music (Billy the Kid, Rodeo), and music that won the hearts
of Americans, including Lincoln Portrait, Fanfare for the Common Man, and Appalachian Spring (Pulitzer Prize, 1945).

His Piano Sonata was commissioned by the Aaron-Coplandplaywright Clifford Odets in 1939 and premiered in Buenos Aires in 1941. Not a populist work like his Appalachian Spring, the Piano Sonata instead represents Copland’s more “profound and personal thought” (Anne Shreffler). The outer sections of the first movement feature dense sonorous chordal writing. Contrasting with this is a quick middle section that indulges in inventive rhythmic play. The second movement explores fast rhythms in irregular, rapidly changing meters. Although the movement is not overtly jazz, Copland acknowledges, “I never would have thought of those rhythms if I had not been familiar with jazz.” The work ends with an extended, slow-moving passage of wide leaps marked “elegiac,” utilizing materials with the contours and moods of American folk ballads. Copland writes that he did not want to end with “the usual flash of virtuosic passages; instead, it is grandiose and massive.”

Maurice Ravel (1875-1937)
Valses nobles et sentimentales

 The early 20th century French composer Maurice Ravel wrote that “the title Valses nobles et sentimentales clearly indicates my intention to compose a series of waltzes following the example of Schubert. This piece was first performed amid protestations and catcalls at a concert of the Société Musicale Indépendante.” The year was 1911, and the brash opening chords, which sound fiery and energetic to our ears, appeared to confound Ravel’s contemporaries. One critic said “the soloist must be playing handfuls of wrong notes!” The set of eight uninterrupted waltzes did not gain popularity until the following year when Ravel orchestrated them as music for a ballet. Since there is no indication, the listener can decide which of the waltzes are noble and which are sentimental.  Ravel headlined the score with a line from the poet Henri de Régnier: “…the pleasure, delectable and ever new, of devoting oneself to something useless.” Debussy said they were the work of “the subtlest ear that ever existed.”

Robert Schumann (1810-1856)
Carnaval, Op. 9

 Carnaval was written in 1834-35 and subtitled Scènes mignonnes sur quatre notes (Little Scenes on Four Notes). The work is a collection of short pieces that represent masked revelers at Carnival, a festival occurring before the Christian tradition of Lent. Schumann imagines the masked revelers as himself, his friends, colleagues, and characters from commedia dell’arte (improvised Italian comedy featuring stereotyped characters).

The musical vignettes, intended as encoded puzzles or musical cryptograms, are all constructed from various combinations of four notes. Schumann impishly predicted that, “deciphering my masked ball will be a real game for you.”  The four notes are derived from the name of the German town, Asch. This was the hometown of Schumann’s then current flame, Ernestine von Fricken. Real and imagined characters from Schumann’s life are portrayed, including Chopin, Paganini, and his wife-to-be Clara; the two aspects of Schumann’s musical personality, the quiet dreamer Eusebius and the passionately intense Florestan; and figures from commedia dell’arte. Every piece in Carnaval, except the Préambule, is based on the ASCH motif, which usually appears at the beginning and is then developed in ways both obvious and obscure. However, Schumann said he was more interested in the “soul-states,” the emotions and the moods, conjured by the music than in programmatic associations of the movement titles.


The Emperor

Mozart Symphony No. 40 in G Minor, K. 550
Caroline Shaw Entr’acte
Beethoven Piano Concerto No. 5 in E-Flat Major, Op. 73 “Emperor”

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)
Symphony No. 40 in G Minor, K. 550

Mozart

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, posthumous portrait by Barbara Krafft, 1819 (Wikimedia Commons)

From the beginning of Mozart’s symphonic career in 1763 (when he was seven years old) until 1780, the majority of his 41 symphonies were written when he lived in Salzburg. In his last decade (1781-1791) Mozart lived in Vienna where he busied himself with opera, piano concerti, and chamber music, but where he wrote only six symphonies.  From 1782-1786, he composed the three symphonies Nos. 35, 36, and 38, and then in a six-week period in the summer of 1788, Mozart composed three extraordinary symphonies, Nos. 39, 40, and 41 “Jupiter”. The origin of this final symphonic trilogy has been the subject of much speculation among Mozart scholars. In Mozart’s time it was unthinkable for a composer to write music for his own pleasure; music was composed because it was sure to be used (and paid for), so it is unlikely that Mozart wrote these symphonies without having a probable opportunity to present them. Yet, there is no evidence of these symphonies being performed in any concerts during Mozart’s final three years. Despite the best efforts of Mozart’s biographers, the mystery of the composer’s last three symphonies remains just that.

The Symphony in G Minor, K. 550 is one of the most beloved of all symphonies and no other symphony of Mozart’s, not even the “Jupiter,” has aroused so much comment as this one. This symphony “is a remarkable fusion of opposites: of passion and elegance, sorrow and exultation, darkness and light” (Linda Mack, Andrews University). It is an exquisite example of the classical style and an important link between classicism and romanticism.

Caroline Shaw (b. 1982)
Entr’acte

Caroline Shaw is a New York based musician who appears in many different guises. In 2013 she became the youngest ever Pulitzer Prize winner for her composition Partita for 8 Voices. She is a Grammy-winning singer in the vocal ensemble “Roomful of Teeth” and as a violinist she Caroline Shawperforms with the American Contemporary Music Ensemble (ACME). She has also performed with the Trinity Wall Street Choir, the Mark Morris Dance Group, and has appeared incognito as a backup singer and violinist on Saturday Night Live with Paul McCartney, on the Dave Letterman Show with The National (American indie rock band), on the Tonight Show with The Roots (American hip hop/neo soul band). Shaw has been a Rice University Goliard Fellow (busking and fiddling in Sweden) and a Yale Baroque Ensemble Fellow.  In addition to maintaining a busy freelance career as a violinist and singer, she has received commissions to write music for the Carmel Bach Festival, the Cincinnati Symphony, the Guggenheim Museum, the Baltimore Symphony, and others. She is currently a doctoral candidate in composition at Princeton University.

Entr’acte [meaning “between acts”] was written in 2011 after hearing the Brentano Quartet play Haydn’s Op. 77 No. 2. My piece is structured like a minuet and trio, riffing on that classical form but taking it a little further. I love the way some music suddenly takes you to the other side of Alice’s looking glass, in a kind of absurd, subtle, Technicolor transition.” Entr’acte was first performed in 2011 by the Brentano Quartet at Princeton University. The string orchestra version was commissioned in 2014 by “A Far Cry” (Grammy-nominated, Boston-based chamber orchestra).

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
Piano Concerto No. 5 in E-Flat Major, Op. 73 “Emperor”

Beethoven

(Beethoven with the Missa solemnis, 1819, portrait by Joseph Karl Stieler – Photo public domain)

Beethoven’s time was one of revolutions, wars, terror, reforms, poverty and extravagance, and his music reflects the turbulence of his age.  He stretched the Viennese Classical tradition that he inherited from Mozart and Haydn into a revolutionary new style of  “grandiose dimensions, profound utterances, and highly willful rhetoric of unprecedented power” (Robert Levin).

20th century music critic Peter Latham painted this cheerful picture of the young Beethoven in Vienna, the years before his deafness, his illnesses and his lost loves: “His genius was acknowledged by all, and there was an animation about the young Beethoven that people found immensely appealing, an almost untamed and passionate quality in both his performance and his personality.” New York Times critic Harold Schonberg further described him in his fascinating study The Great Pianists (1987): “His playing was overwhelming not so much because Beethoven was a great virtuoso, but because he had an ocean-like surge and depth that made all other playing sound like the trickle of a rivulet.”

Beethoven wrote his Concerto No. 5 in E-Flat Major for Piano and Orchestra “Emperor in Vienna in 1809. It is dedicated to Archduke Rudolf, Beethoven’s patron, friend and student. The sobriquet “Emperor” dates from Beethoven’s time, however the source is unclear. It premiered November 28, 1811 in Leipzig, but unlike the premieres of his first four piano concerti, the soloist was not Beethoven but Friedrich Schneider, a 25-year-old church organist. Although it wasn’t common knowledge at the time, Beethoven’s deafness was so advanced that he may have turned the soloist’s work over to someone else rather than admit the difficulties he had playing with an orchestra. To those who packed the Leipzig Gewandhaus, this concerto was full of brilliance and surprises, and the performance was enthusiastically received. The critic for Allgemeine musikalische Zeitung reported that this was “undoubtedly one of the most original, imaginative, effective—but also most difficult—of all existing concertos.”

About Conrad Tao
Conrad_Tao_-_Photo_credit_Mark_Kitaoka
Conrad Tao has appeared worldwide as a pianist and composer, and has been dubbed a musician of “probing intellect and open-hearted vision” by The New York Times, a “thoughtful and mature composer” by NPR, and “ferociously talented” by TimeOut New York. In June of 2011, the White House Commission on Presidential Scholars and the Department of Education named Tao a Presidential Scholar in the Arts, and the National Foundation for Advancement in the Arts awarded him a YoungArts gold medal in music. Later that year, Tao was named a Gilmore Young Artist, an honor awarded every two years highlighting the most promising American pianists of the new generation. In May of 2012, he was awarded the prestigious Avery Fisher Career Grant.

 

In June of 2013, Tao kicked off the inaugural UNPLAY Festival at the powerHouse Arena in Brooklyn, which he curated and produced. The festival, featured Conrad with guest artists performing a wide variety of new works. Across three nights encompassing electroacoustic music, performance art, youth ensembles, and much more, UNPLAY explored the fleeting ephemera of the Internet, the possibility of a 21st-century canon, and music’s role in social activism and critique. Tao’s career as composer has garnered eight consecutive ASCAP Morton Gould Young Composer Awards and the Carlos Surinach Prize from BMI.

Tao has recorded numerous works including the Mozart Piano Concertos with the Santa Fe Pro Musica Orchestra, Thomas O’Connor, Conductor released in 2012. Mr. Tao’s Mozart Piano Concerto CDs will be available at the concerts.

For more information, please visit Conrad Tao’s website at http://www.conradtao.com

Watch and Listen

Conrad Tao talks about his relationship with music and how he sees being a musician as being on an infinite path | Conrad Tao Electronic Press  Kit | https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kV-t_0LV9zc

A live performance of A Walk for Emelio from Conrad Tao’s album Pictures | https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zDqGatsFnJs

About Santa Fe Pro Musica

Season Opening webSanta Fe Pro Musica, founded in 1980, is a non-profit performing arts organization dedicated to inspiring and educating audiences of all ages through the performance of great music. Pro Musica performs a varied repertoire, covering four centuries of music on modern and baroque instruments, including works for chamber orchestra, small ensemble and large-scale works for orchestra and chorus. In 2008, Pro Musica’s recording of Gustav Mahler’s Das Lied von der Erde (chamber arrangement by Schoenberg) was nominated for a GRAMMY® award in the classical category of Best Classical Album/Small Ensemble. In August of 2012, Santa Fe Pro Musica Recordings produced a CD of Conrad Tao, pianist, performing Mozart Piano Concertos No. 17 and No. 25 and in 2013 produced a CD of music by Britten and Vaughan Williams. In addition to gaining national recognition over its 33 years for its artistry in performance, Santa Fe Pro Musica offers some of the most distinguished educational opportunities in northern New Mexico, reaching thousands of students every year with a Youth Concert series, a team-building, ensemble-training program, and a master class series featuring student ensembles working with world-class musicians.

For more information, please visit our website: www.santafepromusica.com

The 2015-2016 Season is partially funded by the City of Santa Fe Arts Commission, the 1% Lodgers Tax, and New Mexico Arts (a Division of the Department of Cultural Affairs).SFAC


Santa Fe Pro Musica sincerely thanks their sponsors and partners for their support:

 

Media Partner| The Santa Fe New Mexican

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Lodging Partners | Hotel Santa Fe, El Rey Inn, The Santa Fe Sage Inn

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Santa Fe Pro Musica Inspires with Holy Week Concerts

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Baroque Holy Week Concerts Inspire

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Santa Fe Pro Musica’s beloved Baroque Holy Week concerts return to the Loretto Chapel this March, featuring the Santa Fe Pro Musica Baroque Ensemble performing works inspired by the secular and the divine. Vocalists Kathryn Mueller and Deborah Domanski will join the Ensemble in music by the great baroque composers Bach and Handel. Join us for this inspiring program.

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Loretto Chapel (Photo by Alaina Diehl)

WHAT | Santa Fe Pro Musica Baroque Ensemble with guest soloists Kathryn Mueller
and Deborah Domanski
WHEN | Thursday, March 24 at 7:30pm, Friday, March 25 at 7:30pm and Saturday, March 26 at 6pm
WHERE | Loretto Chapel, 207 Old Santa Fe Trail, Santa Fe, NM
TICKETS |     $20, $35, $48, $69 at the Santa Fe Pro Musica Box Office (505) 988-4640, ext. 1000, Tickets Santa Fe at The Lensic (505) 988-1234, or online at www.santafepromusica.com. Discounts for students, teachers, groups, and families are available exclusively through the Santa Fe Pro Musica Box Office.

About the Program

Bach | Suite in B Minor, BWV 1067
Albinoni | Sonata in B Minor, Op. 1, No.8
Bach | Jesu soll mein erstes Wort from Cantata 171
Handel | To be performed as a set
Instrumental introduction: Chaconne from Il Pastor Fido
Aria: The terror of the first sin from Cantata HWV 233
Aria: My soul hears from Nine German Arias
Instrumental Interlude: Pastoral Symphony from Messiah
Duet: I was born to weep from Guilio Cesare
Duet: The Lord is my strength from Israel in Egypt
Duet: Come, ever-smiling liberty from Judas Maccabaeus

About the Composers | Bach, Albinoni and Handel

Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)
Suite in B Minor, BWV 1067

Bach by Elias Gottlob Haussmann

Portrait of Bach by Elias Gottlob Haussman

The suite (from the French, “continuation or sequel”) is an instrumental form derived from French Baroque opera and ballet at the court of Louis XIV (1638-1715). A three-part overture forms the first half of the suite. The first part is a dignified introduction worthy of the entrance of the king, followed by a fast section of musical lines that move independently from each other but are melodic and rhythmically imitative. The overture concludes with stately material similar to the opening. The second half of the suite consists of a series of contrasting dances and character-pieces.

Bach’s Suite in B Minor (c. 1730) projects a quiet persona, suiting the tender qualities of the solo flute and strings. It begins with a typical three-part French Overture that is followed by six dances: the Rondeau consists of a recurring melody alternating with new episodes; the Sarabande is a stately and noble dance that Bach spins into a canon between flute and cello; Bourree I with its variant Bourree II are the liveliest of the 17th century French country dances, with a vigorously rhythmic character; the Polonaise is a Polish dance with a dignified character; the Menuet (Latin, minutus: small) has a graceful and formal character, marked by small steps and movements that give the dance its name; and the Badinerie (French, badinage: jest, joke or tease) is Bach’s only known use of this quirky and rhythmically intricate character piece.

Tomaso Albinoni (1671-1751)
Sonata in B Minor, Op. 1, No. 8

Tomaso Albinoni was an Italian singer, violinist and composer equally of vocal music and instrumental music. Much of his music was lost during World War II with the bombing of the Dresden State Library where his manuscripts resided. However, nine collections of instrumental music were published during his lifetime with subsequent reprints, resulting in the existence of these collections today. The opus 1 sonatas, a set of 12, were published in 1694 and were written for 2 violins and basso continuo (cello and organ or harpsichord). These are in the style of the sonata da chiesa (church sonata), a four-movement form of a more serious character, as opposed to the sonata da camera (chamber sonata), a secular form, which often included dances.

Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)
Jesu soll mein erstes Wort (from Cantata 171)

Bach spent much of his career in service to the Lutheran church. The typical worship service included an hour-long sermon that would be preceded by a cantata (a multiple movement work for voice and instruments) based on the liturgy for the day.  Over his lifetime, he wrote several hundred sacred cantatas based on Biblical texts, contemporary poetry and favorite chorales. The aria Jesu soll mein erstes Wort , for soprano, solo violin and continuo, is from Cantata 171 and was written for New Year’s Day 1729. It is exuberantly hopeful and eagerly embraces whatever the future might bring.

George Frideric Handel (1685 – 1759)

HandelHandel was born in Germany, musically trained in the music capitals of Italy, and spent most of his brilliant career in London. Initially he brought Italian opera to enthusiastic audiences in London. However, Italian opera was declining in England for a variety of reasons, including the “rising English annoyance with a form of entertainment in an unintelligible language sung by artists of whose morals they disapproved” (Britannica). As a consequence, Handel turned to creating oratorios, large-scale musical forms for solo voices, chorus, and orchestra, in the English language, without acting or scenery, and usually dramatizing a story from the Bible.  Although based on sacred scripture, Handel’s oratorios were not church music for liturgical use, but “pious concerts” for public performance, meant to be at the same time edifying and entertaining.

“Above all, Handel’s music is eminently vocal. His writing for the solo voice is outstanding in its suitability for the medium and its unerring melodic line. He had a striking ability to depict human character musically in a single scene or aria, a gift used with great dramatic power in his operas and oratorios” (Britannica).

Selected arias and instrumental music (To be performed as a set):

Instrumental Introduction: Chaconne | The chaconne is a set of variations upon a repeating harmonic pattern. This particular Chaconne is from Handel’s opera Il Pastor Fido (The Faithful Shepherd) where the action takes place in the idyllic paradise of Arcadia.

Aria (mezzo-soprano) | The terror of the first sin (Vacillo, per terro del primo errore) is from a sacred cantata written while Handel was in Italy. It was first performed in 1708 and commemorates the deliverance of Rome from an earthquake.

Aria (soprano) | My soul hears (Meine Seele hört) is from Handel’s collection Nine German Arias (1725), set to poems by Barthold Heinrich Brockes called Earthly Pleasure in God. It is a cheerful affirmation of God (“all rejoices, all laughter”).

Instrumental Interlude | The Pastoral Symphony from Messiah depicts happy country bagpipers descending from the mountains to play music in the village streets.

Duet | I was born to weep (Son nata a lagrimar) is from Handel’s opera Guilio Cesare (1724), and is a heart-rending duet about a mother and the loss of her son.

Duet | The Lord is my strength is from Handel’s oratorio Israel in Egypt (1739) and renders the gentle and prayerful feelings among the women during the tumultuous Exodus.

Duet | Come, ever-smiling liberty is from the Handel’s oratorio Judas Maccabaeus (1747) and rejoices in the promise of peace and freedom.

About Kathryn Mueller

Kathryn

Kathryn Mueller, soprano (Photo by Nick Amonson)

Described as a singer “who thoroughly captures the imagination” by the Albuquerque Journal, soprano Kathryn Mueller has also been praised by San Francisco Classical Voice for her “lovely tone and easy agility.” Her frequent solo concert engagements across the United States include appearances with American Bach Soloists, Portland Baroque Orchestra, the Washington Bach Consort, Santa Fe Pro Musica, Phoenix Symphony, New Mexico Symphony Orchestra, Winston-Salem Symphony, Tucson Symphony Orchestra, Miami’s Firebird Orchestra, Atlanta’s New Trinity Baroque, and Chicago’s Ars Antigua. She has also sung operatic roles with companies including Arizona Opera and Bach Collegium San Diego.

Kathryn recorded two GRAMMY-nominated albums with Seraphic Fire, and is featured as a soloist on recordings by New Trinity Baroque, the Santa Fe Desert Chorale, Tucson Chamber Artists, and Seraphic Fire, including Seraphic Fire’s best-selling Monteverdi Vespers of 1610, which reached the top of the iTunes classical chart.

Please read Kathryn’s complete biography on her website: http://www.kathrynmueller.com

About Deborah Domanski

Deborah-Domanski-2Known for her scintillating musicality and impeccable professionalism, Deborah’s career highlights thus far include leading roles with The Santa Fe Opera, Austin Lyric Opera, Michigan Opera Theater, New Orleans Opera, Opera Naples, Tulsa Opera, and St Petersburg Opera. Ms. Domanski’s solo concert performance engagements include The American Symphony Orchestra, Los Angeles Philharmonic, The Hong Kong Philharmonic, Utah Symphony, The Santa Fe Pro Musica Contemporary & Baroque Ensembles, The Asheville Symphony, and The Grand Rapids Bach Festival and her Weill Concert Hall debut as part of the Horne Foundation’s The Song Continues recital series at Carnegie Hall.

Please read more on Ms. Domanski’s website: http://deborahdomanski.com/biography/

About the Santa Fe Pro Musica Baroque Ensemble
Santa Fe Pro Musica, founded in 1980, is a non-profit performing arts organization dedicated to inspiring and educating audiences of all ages through the performance of great music. Pro Musica performs a varied repertoire, covering four centuries of music on modern and baroque instruments, including works for chamber orchestra, small ensemble and large-scale works for orchestra and chorus. In 2008, Pro Musica’s recording of Gustav Mahler’s Das Lied von der Erde (chamber arrangement by Schoenberg) was nominated for a GRAMMY® award in the classical category of Best Classical Album/Small Ensemble. In August of 2012, Santa Fe Pro Musica Recordings produced a CD of Conrad Tao, pianist, performing Mozart Piano Concertos No. 17 and No. 25 and in 2013 produced a CD of music by Britten and Vaughan Williams. In addition to gaining national recognition over its 33 years for its artistry in performance, Santa Fe Pro Musica offers some of the most distinguished educational opportunities in northern New Mexico, reaching thousands of students every year with a Youth Concert series, a team-building, ensemble-training program, and a master class series featuring student ensembles working with world-class musicians.

For more information, please visit our website: www.santafepromusica.com


 

The 2015-2016 Season is partially funded by the City of Santa Fe Arts Commission, the 1% Lodgers Tax, and New Mexico Arts (a Division of the Department of Cultural Affairs).

Santa Fe Pro Musica sincerely thanks their sponsors and partners for their support:

inn and spa

Lodging Partner

ksfr logo

Media Partner

 

 

 

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The Lark Ascending: The Santa Fe Pro Music Orchestra with Colin Jacobsen

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Santa Fe Pro Musica ushers in the spring with its concert The Lark Ascending featuring the Santa Fe Pro Musica Orchestra with guest violinist Colin Jacobsen in performance at the Lensic Performing Arts Center on Saturday, March 5 at 4pm and Sunday, March 6 at 3pm. The performance includes works by Haydn and Prokofiev, and Vaughan Williams’ The Lark Ascending.

The Washington Post notes “Armed with vision, courage, a sense of humor and a devastating bow arm, violinist Colin Jacobsen is emerging as one of the most interesting figures on the classical music scene.”

Santa Fe Pro Musica Orchestra

Santa Fe Pro Musica Orchestra

WHAT | Santa Fe Pro Musica Orchestra, Tom O’Connor conductor and Colin Jacobsen, violinist
WHEN | Saturday, March 5 at 4pm & Sunday, March 6 at 3pm
WHERE | Lensic Performing Arts Center, 211 W San Francisco St, Santa Fe, N
TICKETS | $20, $35, $48, $69 at the Santa Fe Pro Musica Box Office (505) 988-4640, ext. 1000, Tickets Santa Fe at The Lensic (505) 988-1234, or online at www.santafepromusica.com. Discounts for students, teachers, groups, and families are available exclusively through the Santa Fe Pro Musica Box Office.

MEET THE MUSIC | Thomas O’Connor, Santa Fe Pro Musica Conductor and Music Director, presents a “behind the scenes” discussion of the music, one hour prior to each concert. Meet the Music is free to ticket holders. Learn more about the music you love!

ARTIST DINNER WITH COLIN JACOBSEN | Following the concert on Sunday, March 6 at 5:30pm, we invite you to dine with Colin Jacobsen and Santa Fe Pro Musica muscians. 315 Restaurant and Wine Bar is offering a sumptuous menu especially selected for our guests. Tickets to the Artist Dinner are available through our Box Office for $85 a person, a portion of which is tax deductible. Seating is limited, so call no later than March 1 to reserve your seat. 505-988-4640 ext 1000. 315 Restaurant and Wine Bar is located at 315 Old Santa Fe Trail, Santa Fe, NM.

About the Program

Haydn | Symphony No. 103 in E-Flat Major “Drum Roll”
Vaughan Williams | The Lark Ascending
Prokofiev | Violin Concerto No. 2 in G Minor, Op. 63

About the Composers | Haydn, Vaughan Williams and Prokofiev

Franz Joseph Haydn (1732-1809)
Symphony No. 103 in E-Flat Major “Drum Roll”

Haydn-hardy-1792Haydn spent nearly 30 years (1761-1790) as Music Director for the wealthy Esterházy family at their remote estate in rural Hungary. Upon the death of his employer Prince Nikolaus in 1790, the successor, Prince Anton, who did not inherit his father’s pleasure in music, dismissed the resident orchestra. Haydn, however, remained Music Director with a full salary, but without any responsibilities. With income and freedom, Haydn accepted an offer from the impresario Johann Peter Salomon to compose and conduct an opera, six symphonies, and twenty other pieces during an extended stay in England. Haydn’s music was then especially fashionable in London and crowds flocked to see “the sight of that renowned composer. He so electrified the audience as to excite an attention and a pleasure superior to any that had ever been caused by instrumental music in England” (Charles Burney, 1726-1814).

For this visit Haydn created many of his best-known and most outstanding works, notably the twelve London Symphonies, which includes the Drum Roll Symphony. This symphony was premiered on March 2, 1795 at King’s Theatre, London. The review was glowing: “Another new symphony, by the fertile and enchanting Haydn, was performed, and had continual strokes of genius.”

The first movement is exceptionally somber and brooding, and opens with the famous long roll on the timpani for which this symphony is named. Following this darkness, the movement brings a bright change in mood. The second movement, Andante, is a set of variations. The third movement Menuetto features two themes, a lively folk-like first theme and a melancholy second theme. A short fanfare for two horns ushers in the spirited finale. Haydn never hesitated to incorporate folk elements in his music, and the theme of this final movement, together with the themes in the Andante, were folk tunes that would have been familiar to the Croatian folk inhabiting the countryside surrounding the Esterházy estate.

Ralph Vaughan Williams (1872-1958)
The Lark Ascending

Vaughan Williams’ career spanned the first half of the 20th century. A dedicated musicologist, he collected and catalogued over 800 English folk songs. His music is inspired by English folk song, hymnody and Elizabethan music, the great baroque composers Bach and Handel, the colorful impressionism of Ravel and Debussy, and yet integrates the emotional tensions he experienced during the turbulent years of World War I and II.

In 1914, Vaughan Williams began work on his lyric tone poem The Lark Ascending, finishing it in 1919 only after the conclusion of World War I. “The Lark Ascending is one of the supreme achievements of English landscape painting. In a single sweep of velvety pastoral writing, Vaughan Williams extols the joys of nature, the call of the lark, and the genial folk music of earlier, happier times” (Phillip Huscher, Chicago Symphony Orchestra). Vaughan Williams prefaced the piece with this poem by the English poet George Meredith (1828-1909).

He rises and begins to round,
He drops the silver chain of sound,
Of many links without a break,
In chirrup, whistle, slur and shake.

For singing till his heaven fills,
‘Til love of earth that he instills,
And ever winging up and up,
Our valley is his golden cup
And he the wine which overflows
To lift us with him as he goes.

Till lost on his aerial rings
In light, and then the fancy sings.

Sergei Prokofiev (1891-1953)
Violin Concerto No. 2 in G Minor, Op. 63

ProkofievA major musical figure of the 20th century and an accomplished pianist, Sergei Prokofiev tried to stay out of the tumultuous and stifling politics of the Soviet Union. He stated that, “in the Soviet Union music is addressed to millions of people who formerly had little or no contact with music. It is this new mass audience that the modern Soviet composer must strive to reach.” In conformity with this view, he produced works with clear formal structures, beautiful melodies, catchy rhythms and stunning orchestral color. In addition to its serious side, Prokofiev’s music is full of wit, humor and playfulness.

Prokofiev started his Violin Concerto No. 2 on a visit to Paris in 1934, a commission for the violinist Robert Soetens. Prokofiev remarked that, “the number of places in which I wrote the concerto shows the kind of nomadic concert-tour life I led then. The main theme of the 1st movement was written in Paris, the first theme of the 2nd movement at Voronezh, the orchestration was finished in Baku and the premiere was given in Madrid.”

The Violin Concerto No. 2 begins with the soloist entering unaccompanied in a    haunting, Russian-inspired song. It rises to a rhythmic outburst only to subside into melancholy. This movement unfolds in the development of these two contrasting musical ideas. The long-breathed melody of the second movement is underscored with a light accompaniment, like the ticking of a clock. The mood is mostly serene, only disturbed from time to time by more urgent music. The finale is brash and athletic, with a rustic main theme suggesting 19th century peasant tunes. The unexpected use of castanets seems to predict its world premiere in Madrid, Spain.

Colin Jacobsen 2About Colin Jacobsen

Violinist and composer Colin Jacobsen is “one of the most interesting figures on the classical music scene” (The Washington Post). An eclectic composer who draws on a range of influences, he was named one of the top 100 composers under 40 by NPR listeners. He is also active as an Avery Fisher Career Grant-winning soloist and a touring member of Yo-Yo Ma’s famed Silk Road Ensemble. For his work as a founding member of two game-changing, audience-expanding ensembles – the string quartet Brooklyn Rider and orchestra The Knights – Jacobsen was recently selected from among the nation’s top visual, performing, media, and literary artists to receive a prestigious and substantial United States Artists Fellowship.

Colin Jacobsen has an extraordinary musical history as a composer and performer. Jacobsen’s work a composer developed as a natural outgrowth of his chamber and orchestral collaborations. Jointly inspired by encounters with leading exponents of non-Western traditions and by his own classical heritage, his writing reveals an eclectic personal voice with a “knack for spinning lines with an elasticity that sounds uncannily like improvisation” (The New York Times). As a touring member of Yo-Yo Ma’s venerated Silk Road Project since its founding in 2000, Jacobsen has participated in residencies and performances at the Art Institute of Chicago, the Hollywood Bowl, and across the U.S., as well as in Azerbaijan, China, Hong Kong, Japan, Malaysia, and Switzerland. As a violin soloist, Jacobsen was “born to the instrument and its sweet, lyrical possibilities” (The New York Times). He has collaborated with orchestras including the New York Philharmonic and San Francisco Symphony, and has premiered concertos by Kevin Beavers and Lisa Bielawa. He has performed with such prominent artists as Emanuel Ax, Joshua Bell, Steven Isserlis, Yo-Yo Ma, Christian Tetzlaff, Mitsuko Uchida, and composer Tan Dun, with whom he toured China. With Pink Floyd’s Roger Waters as narrator, Jacobsen recently performed Stravinsky’s L’histoire du soldat. For more information, please visit Colin Jacobsen’s website at http://www.colinjacobsen.com

Watch and Listen
Colin Jacobsen plays Chopin’s Nocturne Op. 9 No. 2 | https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QOlF3tJLTUs&index=1&list=PL9Ctfxkkxr0B1feME97-J0UbBmc0M8JeX

Colin Jacobsen talks about the role of the Silk Road Ensemble in his life | Yo-Yo Ma, The Silk Road Ensemble | A Playlist Without Borders: Colin Jacobsen | https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b6lxjVvmbfU

About Santa Fe Pro Musica

Santa Fe Pro Musica, founded in 1980, is a non-profit performing arts organization dedicated to inspiring and educating audiences of all ages through the performance of great music. Pro Musica performs a varied repertoire, covering four centuries of music on modern and baroque instruments, including works for chamber orchestra, small ensemble and large-scale works for orchestra and chorus. In 2008, Pro Musica’s recording of Gustav Mahler’s Das Lied von der Erde (chamber arrangement by Schoenberg) was nominated for a GRAMMY® award in the classical category of Best Classical Album/Small Ensemble. In August of 2012, Santa Fe Pro Musica Recordings produced a CD of Conrad Tao, pianist, performing Mozart Piano Concertos No. 17 and No. 25 and in 2013 produced a CD of music by Britten and Vaughan Williams. In addition to gaining national recognition over its 33 years for its artistry in performance, Santa Fe Pro Musica offers some of the most distinguished educational opportunities in northern New Mexico, reaching thousands of students every year with a Youth Concert series, a team-building, ensemble-training program, and a master class series featuring student ensembles working with world-class musicians.

For more information, please visit our website: www.santafepromusica.com


The 2015-2016 Season is partially funded by the City of Santa Fe Arts Commission, the 1% Lodgers Tax, and New Mexico Arts (a Division of the Department of Cultural Affairs).

Santa Fe Pro Musica sincerely thanks their sponsors and partners for their support:

Lodging Partners 

Hotel SF

El Rey logo

Posted in About the Composer, About the Music, Concert, Meet the Music, The Lensic Performing Arts Center, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment