Classical Weekend, January 2015

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Santa Fe Pro Musica
Classical Weekend
January 2015
Santa Fe Pro Musica Orchestra
Thomas O’Connor, conductor
Benjamin Hochman, piano

Recital: Wednesday, January 21 at 7:30pm
St. Francis Auditorium, New Mexico Museum of Art

Orchestra: Saturday, January 24 at 4pm and Sunday, January 25 at 3pm
Lensic Performing Arts Center

 

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WHAT: Classical Weekend Recital featuring Benjamin Hochman, piano 
WHEN: Wednesday, January 21, 2015 at 7:30pm
WHERE: St. Francis Auditorium, New Mexico Museum of Art, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Ludwig van Beethoven Fantasy in G Minor, Op. 77
Ludwig van Beethoven Sonata No. 27 in E Minor, Op. 90
Ludwig van Beethoven Sonata No. 28 in A Major, Op. 101
Leoš Janáček On an Overgrown Path (selections)
Robert Schumann Fantasy in C Major, Op. 17

The 2014-2015 Season is partially funded by the City of Santa Fe Arts Commission, the 1% Lodgers Tax, and New Mexico Arts (a Division of the Department of Cultural Affairs).

Advertising Partner:

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Program notes by Carol Redman

Beethoven, Janáček, and Schumann

Benjamin Hochman writes about this recital: “I wanted to show the progression from Beethoven to Schumann: the Schumann Fantasy was composed as a tribute to Beethoven and was intended to raise funds for a Beethoven monument in Bonn. The Beethoven sequence (Fantasy, Op. 90, Op. 101) is from a uniquely inspired creative period for him. They are three remarkable works, totally original and incredibly beautiful. They form a triptych, with some interesting thematic connections and key relations. Also, I have always thought of Op. 101 as proto-Schumannesque in many ways. The Janáček, to me, has much in common with Schumann in the emotional directness and unconventional personal viewpoint and so I wanted to place it alongside the Schumann on the second half. Lastly, I wanted to use the contrasting Fantasies of Beethoven and Schumann to frame the program.”

Fantasy (fantasia, fancy, phantasy, fantasie, phantasie) is a musical composition, usually instrumental (not vocal) with Renaissance roots. It is a written adjunct to the art of improvisation.

Sonata as a musical genre first appears during the Renaissance Era as a designation for instrumental music: sonata (suonare, to sound) as opposed to cantata (cantare, to sing, or vocal music) and toccata (toccare, to touch, or keyboard music). This is a very popular type of music and currently refers to a multi-movement instrumental work.

The sonata as a compositional technique features a highly structured form, and is essentially the opposite of the fantasy. It is divided into sections with each performing specific functions in the musical argument. Its three sections include an exposition section that presents the themes, a development section where these themes are submitted to an exploration of possibilities, and a recapitulation section where all the themes are restored to their original shape and function.

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)

Fantasy, Op. 77

This Fantasy is “one of Beethoven’s most original and challenging piano works, with a Romantic wildness that easily obscures its ingeniously crafted design” (Barry Cooper, English musicologist). It is believed that this fantasy was originally an improvisation Beethoven played at a concert in 1808. The following year he committed the improvisation to paper.

Sonata No. 27 in E Minor, Op. 90

This sonata was written in 1814 and dedicated to Count Moritz Lichnowsky. The count, who had recently married a young Viennese dancer, asked Beethoven what this sonata meant. Beethoven responded that the first movement represented “a struggle between the head and the heart,” (a reference to the Count marrying below his class). The second (and final) movement was “a conversation with the beloved” and a celebration of their happy union.

Sonata No. 28 in A Major, Op. 101

Written during the summer of 1816 when Beethoven was spending time in the spa town of Baden, this sonata belongs to his final group of masterful piano sonatas. It is a welding together of the Classical sonata form with the Baroque contrapuntal principles of canon and fugue. Beethoven described this sonata as “a series of impressions and reveries.”

Leoš Janáček (1854-1928)

On an Overgrown Path (selections)

Janáček was the foremost Czech composer of his generation. His music is inspired by Slavic folk music and the rhythms and inflections of his native Czech language: “When anyone speaks to me, I listen more to the tonal modulations of this voice than to what is actually being said.”

In Janáček’s set of piano pieces titled On an Overgrown Path, we hear “a spiritual affinity with Schumann’s miniatures, but the rhapsodic aura is entirely his own” (Laurie Shulman, music writer). The title refers to the countryside around his hometown “walking along an overgrown path of old memories.” The complete collection consists of 15 short pieces. The first group of ten was published in 1911 as Small Compositions for Piano, with poetic titles added afterward. Publication of the last five pieces was posthumous in 1942 and without programmatic titles. Some of these pieces appeared as early as 1901 as part of a collection called Slavic Melodies. Sir Charles Mackerras (1925-2010), the famous conductor and respected authority on Janáček, described this work as “completely new and original, different from anything else and impossible to pin down to any one style.”

Robert Schumann (1810-1856)

Fantasy in C Major, Op. 17

Beethoven’s Fantasy, Op. 77 and Schumann’s Fantasy, Op. 17 were composed 30 years apart. Beethoven’s honors the tradition of improvisation in a single movement work. Schumann’s is a multi-movement, larger-scale fantasy. Like most composers of his generation, Schumann was profoundly influenced by Beethoven and actually conceived his fantasy in conjunction with a plan by the city of Bonn to construct a monument to Beethoven.

Schumann incorporated a quotation from Beethoven’s music into the outer movements (An die ferne Geliebte, “To the Distant Beloved”, Op. 98). It was published in 1839 and dedicated to Franz Liszt. The central drama of the Fantasy is Schumann’s romance with Clara Wieck. Her father Friedrich Wieck was opposed to the match, and they were forbidden to meet. The couple not only resorted to secretly exchanging letters, but also sent messages embedded in music (Clara was an excellent pianist). Schumann described the first movement as “the most passionate thing I have ever composed – a deep lament for you.” The use of Beethoven’s “Distant Beloved” quote becomes code. A recurring rhapsodic descending theme is reference to, or a portrait of Clara. One particular episode is titled “with blissful rapture.” He prefaces the entire piece with four lines from Friedrich Schlegel’s Abendröte: Through all the tones that sound/ In earth’s fitful dream/ One gentle note is there/ For the secret listener.

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About Benjamin Hochman

Pianist Benjamin Hochman’s eloquent and virtuosic performances blend artistic bravura with poetic interpretation exciting audiences and critics alike. He performs in major cities around the world as a respected orchestral soloist, recitalist and chamber musician, working with a celebrated array of renowned conductors and colleagues. Described by The New York Times as a “gifted, fast-rising artist,” Mr. Hochman is an impassioned and intelligent exponent of diverse composers, from Bach and Mozart to Kurtág and Lieberson. He strives to express the essence of each composer’s works, resulting in interpretations that the Vancouver Sun described as “stylish and lucid, with patrician authority and touches of elegant wit where context allows.” Possessed of an intellectual and heartfelt musical inquisitiveness, Mr. Hochman frequently juxtaposes familiar works with the unfamiliar in his concert programs to help illuminate each work for the listener, a talent further illustrated by his thoughtful recorded repertoire.

Please read complete biography at: http://www.benjaminhochman.com/bio.html

Season Opening web

WHAT:
Classical Weekend Orchestra
Santa Fe Pro Musica Orchestra
Thomas O’Connor, conductor
Benjamin Hochman, piano

WHEN:
Saturday, January 24 at 4pm
Sunday, January 25 at 3pm

WHERE:
The Lensic Performing Arts Center
211 West San Francisco Street
Santa Fe, NM 87501

Franz Joseph Haydn Symphony No. 92 in G Major “Oxford”
Igor Stravinsky Concerto in E-Flat “Dumbarton Oaks”
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Piano Concerto No. 24 in C Minor, K. 491

TICKETS: $20, $35, $45, $65 at the Santa Fe Pro Musica Box Office (505) 988-4640, Tickets Santa Fe at The Lensic (505) 988-1234, or online at www.santafepromusica.com

Discounts for students, teachers, groups, and families are available exclusively through the Santa Fe Pro Musica Box Office.

Meet the Music: Learn more about the music you love! Thomas O’Connor, Santa Fe Pro Musica Conductor and Music Director, will present a “behind the scenes” discussion of the music one hour prior to each orchestra concert at the Lensic Performing Arts Center – Free to ticket holders.

The 2014-2015 Season is partially funded by the City of Santa Fe Arts Commission, the 1% Lodgers Tax, and New Mexico Arts (a Division of the Department of Cultural Affairs).

Advertising Partner:

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Lodging Partner:

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Program Notes by Carol Redman

Haydn, Stravinsky, and Mozart

Franz Joseph Haydn (1732-1809)

Symphony No. 92 in G Major “Oxford”

In 1791 Europe’s most famous composer Franz Joseph Haydn visited England at the invitation of the impresario Johann Peter Salomon. The music writer Charles Burney suggested to Oxford University (his alma mater) that they invite Haydn to their distinguished city and give him an honorary doctorate. He responded, “The University of Oxford, whose esteemed reputation I have heard abroad, is too great an object for me not to see before I leave England, and I shall take the earliest opportunity of paying it a visit.” Two months later he fulfilled his pledge, and accepted the university’s award. One of Haydn’s symphonies was selected to be performed at the event and has since become known as the Oxford Symphony. However, this symphony was originally one of three that Haydn had already written in the late 1780s for a group of aristocrats in Paris and Bavaria and was not composed with Oxford in mind at all! To be fair, Haydn was honest about the situation. He had initially planned to perform one of his newest symphonies (we do not know which one), from a set of 12 called the London Symphonies that he had specifically written for this grand English tour. However, there was no time to rehearse any new music before the investiture, so the orchestra performed something they already knew, which happened to be Haydn’s Symphony No. 92. One critic remarked it was “very well played, but very familiar.”

Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971)

Concerto in E-flat “Dumbarton Oaks”

The 20th century Russian composer Igor Stravinsky composed his Concerto in E-flat in 1937 on a commission from Mr. and Mrs. Robert Woods Bliss. The first performance was given in 1938 at Dumbarton Oaks, the family estate in Washington D.C., in celebration of their 30th wedding anniversary. Although the official title of this work is Concerto in E-flat, it is more commonly referred to as Dumbarton Oaks. (Today Dumbarton Oaks is Harvard University’s Center for Byzantine Studies.) Mrs. Bliss wanted the work to be called Dumbarton Oaks Concerto with an implied analogy to Bach’s Brandenburg Concertos. Stravinsky’s publisher, Willy Strecker, objected that “No one outside of America will understand the designation or be able to pronounce it…” Strecker suggested a compromise: give the work a formal title, Concerto in E-flat, with the subtitle Dumbarton Oaks.

Stravinsky recalled, “I studied and played Bach regularly during the composition process, and I was greatly attracted to the Brandenburg Concertos, especially the third . . . The first theme of my concerto is, of course, very like Bach’s, and so is my instrumentation – the three violins, three violas, and three celli, all frequently divisi a tré, as in Bach. I do not think, however, that Bach would have begrudged me the loan of these ideas and materials, as borrowing in this way was something he liked to do himself.”

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)

Piano Concerto No. 24 in C Minor, K. 491

Mozart wrote 12 of his 27 piano concertos between 1784 -1786, a period of exceptional musical fertility for him. He had to interrupt his work on The Marriage of Figaro to finish his 24th concerto in time for a concert scheduled in Vienna’s Burgtheater on March 24, 1786. This was to be his last major appearance as a piano soloist. Though he had three more concertos ahead, by then he was losing ground as a pianist and gaining ground as an opera composer. However, Mozart’s focus on opera can be heard in the drama of this piano concerto. No. 24 casts the soloist as a stage character with music often independent of the orchestral statements. The contrasting materials resolve themselves over the course of the whole, but the pathos of the opening is brought full circle when, despite a few hints at a possible happy (major key) ending, Mozart draws the curtain in somber adherence to the original mood. No. 24 is often regarded as Mozart’s grandest essay in the field of concerto composition. It is the only one he composed in that particular key and one of only two he composed in a minor key. Moreover, it is the only one that both begins and ends in the minor (the D minor concerto, K. 466, closes merrily in the major).

“There is a ghostly pathos about the first movement, with its painfully stabbing dissonances, which sometimes erupts into violence, just as there is something strangely wraithlike about the progress of the finale. Sounding like a sombre, hesitant march, to which the mirthlessly dancing measures of the closing pages add no shred of comfort, this closing set of variations is all the more disturbing after the sunlit relief of the major-key slow movement, where the repetitions of the treacherously simple main theme are interwoven with some of Mozart’s most touchingly lovely woodwind detail” (Conrad Wilson, Scottish Chamber Orchestra).

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About Santa Fe Pro Musica

Santa Fe Pro Musica, founded in 1980, is a non-profit performing arts organization dedicated to inspiring and educating audiences of all ages through the performance of great music. Pro Musica performs a varied repertoire, covering four centuries of music on modern and baroque instruments, including works for chamber orchestra, small ensemble and large-scale works for orchestra and chorus. In 2008, Pro Musica’s recording of Gustav Mahler’s Das Lied von der Erde (chamber arrangement by Schoenberg) was nominated for a GRAMMY® award in the classical category of Best Small Ensemble Performance. In August of 2012, Santa Fe Pro Musica Recordings produced a CD of Conrad Tao, pianist, performing Mozart Piano Concertos No. 17 and No. 25. In addition to gaining national recognition over its 32 years for its artistry in performance, Santa Fe Pro Musica offers some of the most distinguished educational opportunities in northern New Mexico, reaching thousands of students every year with a Youth Concert series, a team-building, ensemble-training program, and a master class series for New Mexico School for the Arts students.

For more information, please visit our website: www.santafepromusica.com

The 2014-2015 Season is partially funded by the City of Santa Fe Arts Commission, the 1% Lodgers Tax, and New Mexico Arts (a Division of the Department of Cultural Affairs).

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Autumn, Winter, Fire & Water

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December Musical Offerings

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A Baroque Christmas
Concert Sponsor:

Thornburg

Lodging Partner:

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Music for the Royal Fireworks
Advertising Partner:

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The 2014-2015 Season is partially funded by the City of Santa Fe Arts Commission, the 1% Lodgers Tax, and New Mexico Arts (a Division of the Department of Cultural Affairs).

 

© Santa Fe Pro Musica

 

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Music for the Royal Fireworks, December 2014

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Music for the Royal Fireworks
Santa Fe Pro Musica Orchestra
Thomas O’Connor, conductor
Cármelo de los Santos, violin

Sunday, December 28 at 3pm
Monday, December 29 at 6pm

St. Francis Auditorium, New Mexico Museum of Art

Joyful and triumphant!

Santa Fe Pro Musica celebrates the holidays with Music for the Royal Fireworks, featuring the Santa Fe Pro Musica Orchestra (Thomas O’Connor, conductor) and virtuoso Brazilian violinist Cármelo de los Santos performing beloved works of baroque composers on December 28 and 29 in St. Francis Auditorium.

St Francis Orchestra 3

WHAT:
Music for the Royal Fireworks
Santa Fe Pro Musica Orchestra
Thomas O’Connor, conductor
Cármelo de los Santos, violin

WHEN:
Sunday, December 28 at 3pm
Monday, December 29 at 6pm

WHERE:
St. Francis Auditorium, New Mexico Museum of Art, Santa Fe Plaza
107 West Palace Avenue
Santa Fe, NM 87501

TICKETS: $20, $35, $45, $65 at the Santa Fe Pro Musica Box Office (505) 988-4640, Tickets Santa Fe at The Lensic (505) 988-1234, or online at www.santafepromusica.com

Discounts for students, teachers, groups, and families are available exclusively through the Santa Fe Pro Musica Box Office.

Meet the Music: Learn more about the music you love! Thomas O’Connor, Santa Fe Pro Musica Conductor and Music Director, will present a “behind the scenes” discussion of the music one hour prior to each concert at the St. Francis Auditorium – Free to ticket holders.

The 2014-2015 Season is partially funded by the City of Santa Fe Arts Commission, the 1% Lodgers Tax, and New Mexico Arts (a Division of the Department of Cultural Affairs).

Lodging Partner:

inn and spa

Advertising Partner:

New_KHFM_Logo

PD Fireworks

The Program:

Telemann Water Music
Vivaldi “Autumn” from The Four Seasons
Vivaldi “Winter” from The Four Seasons
Handel Music for the Royal Fireworks

Notes by Carol Redman

Georg Philipp Telemann (1681-1767)
Water Music

Scored for 2 flutes (plus piccolo), 2 oboes, bassoon, string orchestra and keyboard

Telemann’s Water Music is an instrumental suite, a form derived from French opera and ballet at the court of Louis XIV (1638-1715). These extravagant musical productions begin with an overture announcing the arrival of the King. The overture is followed by dances, interludes, and character-pieces. As this form gained popularity, composers created original and independent suites with no connection to opera or ballet.

Telemann composed his Water Music in 1723 for the centennial celebration of the College of the Admiralty in Hamburg, Germany. For the festivities Telemann wrote a suite with representations of the River Elbe and the gods and nymphs of the sea. Nereus, the Old Man of the Sea, is a trusting and gentle god who, with his wife Doris, had fifty lovely daughters, the nymphs of the sea (Nereids). After the overture, the first two dances illustrate their favorite daughter, Thetis, sleeping (Sarabande, a slow, sensual dance) and awakening (Bourrée, a fast dance). These are followed by a dance traditionally played on bagpipes (Loure), depicting the amorous Neptune, Lord and Ruler of the Sea. Then we hear the Nereids at play (Gavotte). Triton, the son of Neptune, appears with his trumpet shell in a comic character-piece (Harlequinade). The stormy Aeolus, god of the winds, blusters through a movement Vivaldi would be proud to call his own. Then follows the calm after the storm in a cool menuet. A gentle Gigue bobs with the ebb and flow of the River Elbe. Telemann concludes Water Music with rollicking mariners on shore leave in an exotic dance from the Canary Islands (Canarie).

Antonio Vivaldi (1687-1741)
Autumn and Winter from The Four Seasons

Scored for solo violin, string orchestra and keyboard

Vivaldi was a virtuoso violinist from Venice, the composer of hundreds of spirited and inventive instrumental works, and is recognized as the master of the Baroque concerto. Vivaldi’s kinetic rhythms, fluid melodies and brilliant instrumental effects make his music some of the most popular from the Baroque era. He established the standard three-movement concerto form in which a slow movement appears between two fast outer movements. He is also credited with inventing the ritornello form that became standard for the fast movements of concertos. The ritornello is a musical theme played by the full orchestra that returns throughout the movement, alternating with passages dominated by the soloist who introduces new and often virtuosic music.

Vivaldi’s violin concertos The Four Seasons constitute one of the most famous and beloved collections of string music. Each concerto is prefaced by a poem that describes its contents, and their programmatic nature brings seasonal sights and sounds to the ear.

Autumn

  1. The peasants celebrate the good harvest with singing, dancing, and drinking wine (Vivaldi notated some of the solo violin passages with the description “the drunkard”).
  2. When the singing and dancing stops, everyone falls asleep.
  3.  The hunters set out with horns, guns, and dogs. The wild beasts flee, but become tired and are caught.

Winter

  1. Shivering in the cold and in the icy wind, and with chattering teeth, he stamps his feet to keep warm.
  2. He contentedly sits by the fire while the rain beats down.
  3. Walking on the ice, first carefully, then boldly, he slips and falls. The winds fight each other, but winter still brings pleasure.

George Frideric Handel (1685-1759)
Music for the Royal Fireworks

Scored for 3 oboes, 2 bassoons, 3 horns, 3 trumpets, timpani, string orchestra and keyboard

To celebrate the end of the War of Austrian Succession (1748), King George II hired Chevalier Servandoni to design a fireworks display. Servandoni was a famous stage designer for the Paris Opera and well known for his spectacular stage machinery. For this commission, he designed a fireworks machine 114 feet high and 410 feet long, containing more than 10,000 rockets, and brought in a team of Italian pyro-technicians to operate the huge contraption. At the King’s request, Handel wrote music for a large ensemble of “war-like instruments” to accompany the fireworks display. On April 21, 1749 there was a rehearsal held in Vauxhall Gardens, and according to varying descriptions, between 50 and 100 wind and percussion instruments participated. Public interest was keen; the rehearsal drew an audience of 12,000 and created a traffic jam that tied up London Bridge for hours. The actual performance took place on the evening of April 27, 1749 and it did not go well. English and Italian technicians argued about the operation and safety of the machine. There was an explosion, and a pavilion caught fire. The frustrated Chevalier Servandoni drew his sword and had to be disarmed and arrested.

One month later Handel performed his Fireworks Music for the Foundling Hospital, though with fewer winds and percussion, in a gentler configuration that included a string orchestra. Music for the Royal Fireworks was Handel’s last orchestral composition.

Photo by Leko Machado

Photo by Leko Machado

About Cármelo de los Santos

Brazilian-born violinist Cármelo de los Santos enjoys an exciting career as a soloist, chamber musician, and pedagogue. From his extensive concerto appearances to his recent performances of the 24 Caprices by Paganini, his virtuosity and musical commitment captivate audiences worldwide.

At the age of sixteen Cármelo gained celebrity status in Brazil by winning its most prestigious music competition, the Eldorado Prize, in São Paulo. Since then he has been a guest soloist with more than 40 orchestras, including the New World Symphony, Santa Fe Pro-Musica, the Santa Fe, and New Mexico Symphonies, the Montevideo Philarmonic, Orchestra Musica d’Oltreoceano (Rome), and the major orchestras in Brazil. Cármelo has collaborated with renowned conductors Michael Tilson Thomas, Alejandro Posada, Jean-Jaques Werner, Guillermo Figueroa, Eric Shumsky, Rodolfo Saglimbeni, Yeruham Scharovsky, Jorge Pérez-Gómez, Roberto Tibiriçá, and Jean Reis, among others.

In 2002 Cármelo made his New York debut as soloist and conductor in the Weill Recital Hall at Carnegie Hall with the ARCO Chamber Orchestra.

Cármelo has won prizes in several international competitions, including the first prize at the 4th Júlio Cardona International String Competition (Portugal), first prize at the Music Teachers National Association (MTNA) Collegiate Artist Competition (USA), and second prize in the Young Artist International Competition (Argentina).

With pianist Carla McElhaney and cellist Joel Becktell, Cármelo has formed the group REVEL, a “classical band” based in Austin. The group believes that music is a transformative tool best shared in informal, intimate settings. They present events that they refer to as “revels,” in which audience members enjoy the music on a “first-name” basis. The group performs masterworks for duos and piano trio, and also arranges modern and popular works in a signature style that has become a mainstay of their repertoire.

Cármelo’s commitment to young musicians brings him to music festivals and master classes throughout the world. In his native Brazil, he enjoys working with at-risk students from social programs similar to Venezuela’s famous El Sistema.

Cármelo holds a Bachelor’s degree from Rio Grande do Sul Federal University, Brazil, a Master’s degree from the Manhattan School of Music, and a Doctoral degree from the University of Georgia. His teachers were Fredi Gerling, Marcello Guerchfeld, Sylvia Rosenberg, and Levon Ambartsumian. As a student, he performed in master classes and had consultations with Isaac Stern, Boris Belkin, Eugene Fodor, and Shlomo Mintz, and numerous others.

Cármelo’s 2009 CD release, Sonatas Brasileiras, presents sonatas by Villa-Lobos, Guarnieri, and Santoro (UFRGS Label) and received that year’s Açorianos Prize (Brazil) for best Classical CD, along with the year’s Best Classical Performer prize. The CD “Magic Hour” with REVEL – works for piano trio by Beethoven, Piazzolla, and Kenji Bunch, plus original arrangements by the group – was released in 2012 and can be purchased at http://www.revelmusic.org.

Two CDs are scheduled for release in 2013: “Brazilian Violin Showpieces” – short pieces for violin and piano by Brazilian composers, with pianist Ney Fialkow; and “French Composers,” with the Sonata for Violin and Piano by Debussy, and Ernest Chausson’s Concerto for Violin, Piano, and String Quartet, recorded live at the 2012 Bonneville Chamber Music Festival.

Highlights of Cármelo’s 2013 calendar are the DVD recording of the 24 Caprices by Paganini, and an invitation to judge the 1st Art Center Tokyo International Violin Competition in Kobe, Japan.

Cármelo is an Associate Professor of Violin at the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, where he lives with his wife Eugenia and son Arthur. He plays on a Carl Becker violin, 1929.

Read more at http://carmelodelossantos.com/

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About Santa Fe Pro Musica

Santa Fe Pro Musica, founded in 1980, is a non-profit performing arts organization dedicated to inspiring and educating audiences of all ages through the performance of great music. Pro Musica performs a varied repertoire, covering four centuries of music on modern and baroque instruments, including works for chamber orchestra, small ensemble and large-scale works for orchestra and chorus. In 2008, Pro Musica’s recording of Gustav Mahler’s Das Lied von der Erde (chamber arrangement by Schoenberg) was nominated for a GRAMMY® award in the classical category of Best Classical Album/Small Ensemble. In August of 2012, Santa Fe Pro Musica Recordings produced a CD of Conrad Tao, pianist, performing Mozart Piano Concertos No. 17 and No. 25 and in 2013 produced a CD of music by Britten and Vaughan Williams. In addition to gaining national recognition over its 32 years for its artistry in performance, Santa Fe Pro Musica offers some of the most distinguished educational opportunities in northern New Mexico, reaching thousands of students every year with a Youth Concert series, a team-building, ensemble-training program, and a master class series for New Mexico School for the Arts students, area students, and UNM ensembles.

The 2014-2015 Season is partially funded by the City of Santa Fe Arts Commission, the 1% Lodgers Tax, and New Mexico Arts (a Division of the Department of Cultural Affairs). For more information, please visit our website: www.santafepromusica.com

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Holiday Gift Guide 2014

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A Baroque Christmas 2014

A Baroque Christmas
December 2014

Celebrate with us! Santa Fe Pro Musica is pleased to present its beloved holiday tradition A Baroque Christmas, featuring the Santa Fe Pro Musica Baroque Ensemble with mezzo-sopranos Deborah Domanski and Drea Pressley (alternating performances – please see our website for complete soprano schedule www.santafepromusica.com/Season.html) in the festively decorated historic Loretto Chapel on Friday, December 19 through Wednesday, December 24.

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A Baroque Christmas

Friday, December 19, 2014 at 6pm and 8pm
Saturday, December 20, 2014 at 6pm and 8pm
Sunday, December 21, 2014 at 6pm and 8pm
Monday, December 22, 2014 at 6pm and 8pm
Tuesday, December 23, 2014 at 6pm and 8pm
Wednesday, December 24, 2014 at 6pm and 8pm

Loretto Chapel
207 Old Santa Fe Trail
Santa Fe, NM 87501

Deborah Domanski, mezzo-soprano; Drea Pressley, mezzo-soprano
The Santa Fe Pro Musica Baroque Ensemble
Stephen Redfield and Karen Clarke, violin; Gail Robertson, viola; Carol Redman, flute MaryAnn Shore, oboe and recorder; Sally Guenther, cello; Danny Bond, bassoon
Susan Patrick, organ

TICKETS: $20, $35, $45, $65 (add $5 per ticket for Christmas Eve)
Santa Fe Pro Musica Box Office (505) 988-4640, (800) 960-6680
Tickets Santa Fe at The Lensic (505) 988-1234
www.santafepromusica.com

Holiday Subscription
Attend both holiday concerts (A Baroque Christmas and Music for the Royal Fireworks) and save 10% with a Holiday Subscription, available exclusively through the Santa Fe Pro Musica Box Office: (505) 988-4640, (800) 960-6680.
These will go quickly, so call today!

Concert Sponsor: Thornburg Investment Management
Thornburg

Lodging Partner: Inn and Spa at Loretto
inn and spa

The 2014-2015 Season is partially funded by the City of Santa Fe Arts Commission, the 1% Lodgers Tax, and New Mexico Arts (a Division of the Department of Cultural Affairs).

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George Frideric Handel
Concerto Grosso in G Major (selections from Opus 6)

Antonio Vivaldi
Laudate pueri Dominum, RV 600 (selections)

Georg Philipp Telemann
Quartet in G Major

Traditional Carols
Sussex Carol
Coventry Carol
Wexford Carol
Gaudete, Christus est natus
Ut collocet eum cum principibus

George Frideric Handel (1685-1759)
Concerto Grosso in G Major, Opus 6 (selections)
Scored for flute, oboe, bassoon, strings and keyboard (17 minutes)

Handel was born in Halle, Germany and trained in the German music tradition. In 1707 he moved to Italy where he learned the Italian art of vocal music and opera. Three years later, Handel became Music Director at the Electoral Court of Hanover and returned to Germany. In 1714 Handel’s employer, the Elector of Hanover, was proclaimed King George I of England, and Handel followed him to England. Handel became an English citizen and settled down to a long and prosperous career in London, enjoying the patronage of the royal family and the adulation of the English people.

The concerto grosso was one of the most popular instrumental forms during the Baroque period. It features contrasting textures between a small group of soloists and a larger group of instrumentalists. Handel composed his twelve Concerti Grossi, Opus 6 within a single month in 1739. Donald Burrows (Handel, 1994) proclaimed this set as “one of the marvels of eighteenth-century instrumental music… each concerto can be regarded as an individual masterpiece.”

Antonio Vivaldi (1678-1741)
Laudate pueri Dominum, RV 600 (selections)
Scored for mezzo-soprano, strings, and keyboard (17 minutes)

Vivaldi composed hundreds of spirited and inventive instrumental works. His kinetic rhythms, fluid melodies, and brilliant musical effects make him one of the most popular composers from the Baroque era. Vivaldi’s production of sacred vocal music, though not as substantial as his instrumental works, includes over fifty works.

The Laudate pueri Dominum is one of three settings of Psalm 112 that Vivaldi composed. Each movement musically explores the words and phrases allotted to it, with dramatic operatic writing and colorful textural imagery. The first movement treats all the instruments and the voice equally, reflecting the text that we are all equal in the sight of God (“… and even servants can enter the kingdom of heaven”). In the second movement, Vivaldi borrows from his own Winter Concerto from The Four Seasons and creates a hushed, awe-inspiring landscape invoking eternity (“… from this time forth forevermore”). In the third movement, listen for the rising vocal line illustrating the rising sun, and the long florid lines on the word laudate (“praise”). The angular lines of No. 4 reflect the admonition that we should ever remain humble, as our Lord God who dwells most high. The centerpiece is No. 5 (the doxology “Glory be to the Father”) and is a tender conversation between solo violin and voice. No. 6 is happy and spirited (“… as it was in the beginning is now and ever shall be”). The piece concludes with a glorious Amen.

Georg Philipp Telemann (1681-1767)
Quartet in G Major
Scored for flute, oboe, violin, bassoon, and keyboard (13 minutes)

Telemann, the son of a clergyman, was a self-taught musician. It was expected that he would follow his father’s path, and much was done to dissuade the boy from his fascination with music. Looking back on his struggles, Telemann wrote in 1718: “My fire burned far too brightly, and lighted my way into the path of innocent disobedience, so that I spent many a night with pen in hand because I was forbidden it by day, and passed many an hour in lonely places with borrowed instruments.” His talents were discovered and his reputation became so highly regarded that he was at the top of the list for the most prestigious music positions, whereas another musician, J. S. Bach, ranked second or third.

The Quartet in G Major is part of a set of works called Tafelmusik (table-music). This was a term used since the 16th century for music played at feasts and banquets. In 1733, Telemann published an elaborate collection of pieces that he called Tafelmusik. This collection contains three monumental “Productions,” each one consisting of an overture, quartet, concerto, trio, solo, and a finale. The Quartet in G Major is part of the First Production.

Mistletoe

Traditional Carols

This set of Christmas carols is uniquely arranged by the Santa Fe Pro Musica Baroque Ensemble for voice, flute, recorder, oboe, bassoon, strings and keyboard. (15 minutes)

The Sussex Carol was originally found in The Small Garland of Pious and Godly Songs (1684) by Luke Wadding, an Irish Franciscan bishop. The carol relates how Christians rejoice at the coming of their Redeemer.

The Coventry Carol first appeared in 1534 in a nativity play about the story of King Herod. Upon hearing of the birth of Jesus (rumored to be the new “King of the Jews”), King Herod ordered all baby boys to be killed. As the troops followed the king’s orders, mothers hid with their children and quieted them by singing the lullaby now known as the Coventry Carol.

The Wexford Carol first appears in County Wexford, Ireland and dates to the 12th century. It is a simple and happy retelling of the nativity story.

Gaudete, Christus est natus (Rejoice, Christ is born) is a song of praise. It first appeared in a songbook (1420) found in the village of Jistebnice, now in the Czech Republic.

Ut collocet eum cum principibus (He sits them with princes) is a musical setting of Psalm 112 by Antonio Vivaldi. The text praises the compassion of Christ who seats the poor alongside princes and makes barren women joyful with children.

About Deborah Domanski

Domanski 10 HIGHRESOLUTION

“Magnificent!” That’s the word former General Director Richard Gaddes used to describe Deborah Domanski’s performance in the role of Zenobia in the Santa Fe Opera’s 2008 Season production of Radamisto.

Ms. Domanski’s solo concert engagements include Los Angeles Philharmonic debut under Maestro Esa-Pekka Salonen as the Alto Soloist in Mozart’s Requiem, The Laredo Symphony as alto soloist in Beethoven’s 9th, the Greenwich Choral Society’s performance of Rossini’s Petit Messe Solenelle, and with The Juilliard Choral Union in Vivaldi’s Gloria in Alice Tully Hall. As a Young Artist in the Juilliard Opera Center she was a participant in the prestigious 2002 Juilliard Vocal Arts Honors Recital in Alice Tully Hall. As the 2002 competition winner at the Music Academy of the West, Miss Domanski became the Marilyn Horne Foundation Awardee and was presented in recital, and on national radio and in World Wide Web broadcast in October 2002. January 2005, Deborah made her Weill Concert Hall debut as part of the Horne Foundation’s The Song Continues… recital series at Carnegie Hall.

Please read Ms. Domanski’s complete biography on her website: http://deborahdomanski.com/biography/

About Drea Pressley

DreaP_4669

Drea Pressley, mezzo soprano, performs with the Los Angeles Master Chorale, Los Angeles Philharmonic, and has performed with New Orleans Opera Association, and Operafestival di Roma. As a member of Los Angeles Master Chorale, Ms. Pressley toured Europe with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, premiering John Adam’s new work, The Gospel According to the Other Mary.

Drea enjoys performing with several of New Mexico’s premiere arts organizations, including the Santa Fe Desert Chorale, and has performed with Santa Fe Opera, Santa Fe New Music, the New Mexico Symphony Orchestra, Canticum Novum, and Sangre de Cristo Chorale.

Please read more on Ms. Pressley’s website: www.dreapressley.com

About Santa Fe Pro Musica

Santa Fe Pro Musica, founded in 1980, is a non-profit performing arts organization dedicated to inspiring and educating audiences of all ages through the performance of great music. Pro Musica performs a varied repertoire, covering four centuries of music on modern and baroque instruments, including works for chamber orchestra, small ensemble and large-scale works for orchestra and chorus. In 2008, Pro Musica’s recording of Gustav Mahler’s Das Lied von der Erde (chamber arrangement by Schoenberg) was nominated for a GRAMMY® award in the classical category of Best Classical Album/Small Ensemble. In August of 2012, Santa Fe Pro Musica Recordings produced a CD of Conrad Tao, pianist, performing Mozart Piano Concertos No. 17 and No. 25 and in 2013 produced a CD of music by Britten and Vaughan Williams. In addition to gaining national recognition over its 32 years for its artistry in performance, Santa Fe Pro Musica offers some of the most distinguished educational opportunities in northern New Mexico, reaching thousands of students every year with a Youth Concert series, a team-building, ensemble-training program, and a master class series for New Mexico School for the Arts students, area students, and UNM ensembles.

The 2014-2015 Season is partially funded by the City of Santa Fe Arts Commission, the 1% Lodgers Tax, and New Mexico Arts (a Division of the Department of Cultural Affairs).

For more information, please visit our website: www.santafepromusica.com

© Santa Fe Pro Musica

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The Heavenly Life

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© Santa Fe Pro Musica 2014

Posted in About the Music, About the Performers, Meet the Music | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment